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11 posts

How do I know a font does not have a virus?

Feb 19, 2013 at 01:14

I'm just worried.


Feb 19, 2013 at 01:40

Downloading it always from DaFont... not from other crappy sites...

Edited on Feb 19, 2013 at 01:41 by rocamaco


Feb 19, 2013 at 07:51

not from ♦other♦ crappy sites... which implies ...


Feb 19, 2013 at 09:57

To be active, a virus need to be executed, from an exacutable file, a file that include program or macro or the boot of a file system.

Font don't include this possiblities.
To my knowledge, font can't be infected with a virus (like all files) but can't transmit a virus because this virus can't be activate.


Feb 19, 2013 at 11:04

If you're that worried, have an antivirus software check your files.


Jan 14, 2016 at 07:25

Menhir said  
To be active, a virus need to be executed, from an executable file, a file that include program or macro or the boot of a file system.

Font don't include this possiblities.
To my knowledge, font can't be infected with a virus (like all files) but can't transmit a virus because this virus can't be activate.

Ah, actually, a true type font can contain a virus and one that directly exploits vulnerabilities in the Windows Kernel. Take a look at https://threatpost.com/of-truetype-font-vulnerabilities-and-the-windows-kernel/101263/ which states:

"Attacks like these are executed via an embedded malicious font file dropped into an Office document, such as a Word file. Once the user opens the malicious file—delivered either via a spear phishing email or over the Web—the exploit targets a vulnerability in kernel-mode drivers that improperly handle malicious TrueType font files."

So the question remains for dafont: Do you actively inspect your fonts for malicious code in your fonts?

G.


Jan 14, 2016 at 09:10

Just to make sure I understand this correctly (because it's still early and the coffee hasn't kicked in yet) it concerns the case where someone embeds a corrupt font into an Office document, and hopes for someone else to open the document, am I right? So, it means that the font file itself won't work correctly if some lines of malicious code are being added to "it", right?


Jan 14, 2016 at 15:23

gstunts said  
"Attacks like these are executed via an embedded malicious font file dropped into an Office document, such as a Word file. Once the user opens the malicious file—delivered either via a spear phishing email or over the Web—the exploit targets a vulnerability in kernel-mode drivers that improperly handle malicious TrueType font files."

Said the virus is in the Word file, not in the TTF or OTF.
So, I confirm : a virus can't be in a font file because a font file is not executed (it' only read) and a virus can be activated.
A TTF file can only be damaged by a virus but not transmit a virus.

Edited on Jan 14, 2016 at 15:45 by drf_bot


Jan 14, 2016 at 17:11

As Menhir already wrote 3 years ago, a font file can not contain a virus as a font file is a passive file.

A virus can only activate itself when included in an executable (exe) file.

It is always worthwhile to read before asking the same thing all over again.


Jan 14, 2016 at 19:24

usually with avasy you know if there is a virus or not


Jan 15, 2016 at 03:14

gstunts is correct. don't shoot.



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