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Question about technical limitations

Oct 02, 2012 at 15:39

Hi,

I've never seen a font where, for instance, the horizontal stick in the T goes over other letters (while this is common when hand-writting something). That would mean two different squares have to be defined for each letter, a "collision square" and a "printing area".

I guess these two squares need to match and that's why we don't see any font like that. Am I right?

Thank you.


Oct 02, 2012 at 15:53

Are you looking for something like this ?


Oct 02, 2012 at 16:10

So it's possible... I couldn't find any font like that before.

I was searching for something like that, but where vertical and horizontal sticks were much longer than in this example and the whole font very simple (very simple sans stile instead of handwriting or baroque). Vertical sticks should get close to other lines, so a T should be as if the line above it was underlined.

I've been searching for such a font for very long, but never could find anything remotely similar. The last one is the closest:

http://www.dafont.com/ellianarelles-path.font?text=Trylks&fpp=50&psize=l

But I was searching for something with lines longer and more straight. I may do it by myself at some point in the future, if I ever learn how to do that, now that I know it's at least possible.

Thank you.


Oct 02, 2012 at 18:24

With the True Type Format (TTF), you define two points for each letter : the start (corresponding to the position of the cursor when you place the letter) and a link (the place of the cursor after the letter is written).
Normaly, the design of a letter is between this two points (with usualy a margin). But, technicaly, nothing prevent you to have a design of letter outside this limits.


Oct 02, 2012 at 22:04

Menhir said  (view post)
With the True Type Format (TTF), you define two points for each letter : the start (corresponding to the position of the cursor when you place the letter) and a link (the place of the cursor after the letter is written).
Normaly, the design of a letter is between this two points (with usualy a margin). But, technicaly, nothing prevent you to have a design of letter outside this limits.

Menhir talks here about the bearings of a glyph. The left bearing determines how far left or right the glyph (character) will appear from the cursor. The right bearing determines where the next glyph will start. So if you want one character to overlap the following you need to give that one character a negative left bearing. In the examples given by drf an Menhir this is clearly visible with the T and t for example.

This is how it is done:




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